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August 31, 2016

Comments

Michael Endrizzi

I am a loyal Ravello user at work, AWS certified engineer and user, all my personal apps/data in the cloud, read your blog and love the simple style. However, permit me to argue your point.

1) Microsegmentation - Separating by VLANs and firewalls is dying as fast as data centers are dying. The complexity of coordinating L3 routing with firewall rules and dynamic IP addresses does not scale. Microsegmentation is the next stage. Firewall vendors barely have microsegmentation working on VMware much less the public cloud. AWS only has the equivalent of IPchains which does not scale. It will be a while.

2) VLAN hell. - The limits of using VLANs are bringing it to its knees. 4096 max and limited IP subnet sizes to /23 because of broadcast domains require complex routing configurations the restrict deployment speeds. VXLAN with its suppressed broadcast domains allowing one to build a single 10.0.0.0/8 in theory is L3 Cisco killer...when it works. I don't see that in the public cloud.

3) "My app is slow. May web session randomly works" - I've had too many of these calls trying to figure out who's fault it is. Is Ravello slow? Is Google Slow? Is the Internet slow? I'll call AWS and ask...hmmm no one answers the phone or they laughed at me.

4) Logging - Trying to debug AWS or Ravello via logging is just painful because they control what they log. Try debugging a AWS firewall log.

5) $19K for 10TB - Try storing 10TB into AWS's cheapest storage media Glacier. Pretty cheap huh? Now try pulling it out. Probably about 2 months of your salary. How many of these suprise bills are you ready for. I had a similar experience with Ravello but not nearly as bad just unexpected.

6) Security - AWS has XX number of certifications. Let's hypothetically say our Russian Chinese friends are loose inside of AWS. Do you think you'll get a phone call?

7) Single pane of glass - While you are right data centers are dying there are trillions of dollars of lagacy apps that will never get migrated to public or private cloud. They need to be maintained. How many monitoring apps do you want your help desk to monitor? How many technologies can your help desk manage? Ooops the Python monitoring script failed to report the AWS deployment problem and Johnny GeekHead no longer works here, can 18 year old Fred Jones find it or fix it?

8) Talent - The young crop of techies entering the field are amazing. They program in 10 languages while eating lunch, know firewalls, BGP routing, L2 spanning trees, AD schemas, etc. The people that build and maintain public/private cloud will have to have 10 diverse talents vs the silo'd knowledge stack currently in industry because public/private cloud has centralized control over ALL these technologies. We just need more of these young ones so I can retire and get my hair transplant.

So yes you are right its coming, but public cloud is not a panacea for all apps at this time. Make sure you do your homework before you jump off the cliff.

dreez


Yes

Chuck Hollis

Excellent comment, so thanks!

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Chuck Hollis


  • Chuck Hollis
    SVP, Oracle Converged Infrastructure Systems
    @chuckhollis

    Chuck now works for Oracle, and is now deeply embroiled in IT infrastructure.

    Previously, he was with VMware for 2 years, and EMC for 18 years before that, most of them great.

    He enjoys speaking to customer and industry audiences about a variety of technology topics, and -- of course -- enjoys blogging.

    Chuck lives in Vero Beach, FL with his wife and four dogs when he's not traveling. In his spare time, Chuck is working on his second career as an aging rock musician.

    Warning: do not ever buy him a drink when there is a piano nearby.

    Note: these are my personal views, and aren't reviewed or approved by my employer.
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