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December 01, 2015

Comments

Aernoud van de Graaff

Hi Chuck,

I fully agree that the business interest should be top of mind when providing infrastructure solutions.

Maybe I am old school, but I am a true believer that standardization (where it is possible and makes sense) will help achieve this. I also believe that in most (but not all) situations a generic solution will do.

Because infrastructure is becoming more and more software defined, you can create standardized options that will facilitate different business requirements ensuring that the generic infrastructure solution can cover more and more of the business requirements, also around the DB and App solutions Oracle is bringing to the market.

The biggest issue the infrastructure has today that impacts the efficiency, reliability, security, compliance and agility of their services is complexity. Complexity because of all the variation they introduced in the past and never got rid of and all the variation they will bring in, in the future...

To enable innovation there should always be room to try new things. I would even encourage that and try lots of things, but it should be a designated environment that has a different function and service levels. Once a new technology emerges from that environment, if possible let is land on the generic infra solution, if not, build a well managed exception for it.

So, not everything has to land on a generic platform, but most should and exceptions should be offering tangible benefits for the business that justifies the additional complexity it brings to the infrastructure (and thus more cost, more risk, etc).

And to be honest, in most situations Oracle, IBM, SAP, etc. software runs just fine on generic X86 hardware with either a SAN or even on local storage (Nutanix, VSAN, etc.).

So the best way to support the business is to standardize where you can and eliminate all variants that do not (or no longer) provide key differentiation to the business and limit variation only to where it makes sense for the business.

Hopes this makes sense...

So everybody that recognizes the complexity issues in their organization. CLEAN UP YOUR $%@* !!!

RIch Winston

The subject of this article is at the center of what is happening all over IT. Problem I see is that ORACLE's premise is wrong.

The premise is simple: most important applications use the Oracle Database,
so that is what should drive business-critical infrastructure architecture,
co-engineering, stack optimization and integration.

ORACLE is the center of the mission critical data in the world today but will not be in the future.

Chuck Hollis

Hi Rich

What do you believe will be the center of mission-critical data in the next 5-10 years? I don't see it.

-- Chuck

Gary

Excellent description of the real world as compared to IT centric thinking!

Acton Dara

To whatever IT infrastructure service provider you are contacting, you need to make sure that these services must align with your business requirements and objectives. Since IT infrastructure service kinds are nearly the same in simplicity and standardisation, so the workload is usually average because one size fits all. http://www.thebesgroup.co.uk/managed-services/infrastructure/

The comments to this entry are closed.

Chuck Hollis


  • Chuck Hollis
    SVP, Oracle Converged Infrastructure Systems
    @chuckhollis

    Chuck now works for Oracle, and is now deeply embroiled in IT infrastructure.

    Previously, he was with VMware for 2 years, and EMC for 18 years before that, most of them great.

    He enjoys speaking to customer and industry audiences about a variety of technology topics, and -- of course -- enjoys blogging.

    Chuck lives in Vero Beach, FL with his wife and four dogs when he's not traveling. In his spare time, Chuck is working on his second career as an aging rock musician.

    Warning: do not ever buy him a drink when there is a piano nearby.

    Note: these are my personal views, and aren't reviewed or approved by my employer.
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